Gentlemen: What is Erectile Dysfunction
GENTLEMEN:

What is erectile dysfunction?

Erectile dysfunction is when a man has difficulty getting an erection. Or keeping it long enough for sex. It’s also known as ED or impotence. It happens when not enough blood flows to the penis, preventing an erection.

It affects about 30 million men in the U.S. Some guys with ED find it difficult to either get or keep an erection every time they try to have sex. For others, ED symptoms can happen just once in a while. Either way, you should know that you’re not alone.

ABOUT

ED is not all in your head. It’s not just a part of aging that you have to accept. It’s a real medical condition, so it should be addressed like one. If you think you have ED symptoms, talk to a doctor.

*Data taken from the Massachusetts Male Aging Study. Of 1,290 respondents, 52% stated that they had some degree of ED.

What can cause ED?

ED is often caused by something physical, such as a disease, injury, or side effects from other drugs.

Medical Conditions

Depression
Diabetes
Heart disease
High blood pressure
High cholesterol
Obesity
Prostate cancer treatment
Spinal cord injury

Although most cases of ED have a physical cause, thoughts that lead to depression, worry, or anxiety can also cause ED.

Even when ED has a physical cause, it can be made worse if it leads to depression and worry.

Diabetes is a condition where there is too much sugar, or glucose, in the blood. Over time, high blood sugar levels can damage nerves and blood vessels—like the ones that produce erections. When this occurs, diabetes can lead to ED.

In a study, up to 83% of men with diabetes had some form of ED.

Heart disease can clog or narrow the arteries. This can stop blood from flowing to the penis, and may cause ED. Talk to your doctor to make sure your heart is healthy enough for sex.

High blood pressure makes the heart work harder. This puts strain on the blood vessels, which then harden and narrow. This can prevent blood from getting to the penis and lead to ED. In a study, more than 65% of men with high blood pressure also had ED.

Additionally, some medications used to treat high blood pressure can lead to ED. Make sure your doctor is aware of all medications you are taking.

High cholesterol can clog your arteries. This can slow blood flow to the penis. The result? It can affect the quality of your erections.

In a study, high cholesterol raised men's risk of erectile dysfunction by 80%.

Obesity can cause real harm to your health. For example, it's associated with medical conditions that can affect blood flow. And when blood flow is affected, it can cause ED.

The prostate is a small gland near your bladder. It's next to the nerves that are necessary for an erection to happen. For men with prostate cancer, surgical removal of the prostate can lead to ED.

An injury to the spine can affect many functions in the body. Erectile function is no exception.

Due to nerve damage, some men with spinal cord injuries can't get erections. Others can—but can't keep them hard enough or long enough for sex.

Can your lifestyle have something to do with it?

Yes. Some lifestyle and psychological factors can play a role in causing ED, such as smoking, drinking, and stress because they may lead to conditions that affect blood circulation. 

There are things you can do each day to improve your circulation and avoid some of the conditions that can lead to ED:

  • Find ways to stay more active (mowing the lawn, walking the dog)
  • Help manage your weight by eating healthy and watching your portion size
  • Drink less alcohol
  • Quit smoking. The results can be significant
  • Look for ways to reduce stress in your daily life
GENTLEMEN:

VIAGRA helps guys with ED get and keep an erection.

And it’s been shown to effectively treat ED in guys who have certain other medical conditions. So be sure to tell your doctor about your medical conditions and medications so he can choose the right dose for you.

 

 

VIAGRA helps guys with ED get and keep an erection.
VIAGRA helps guys with ED get and keep an erection.
NEXT:
Learn how VIAGRA works.
How does VIAGRA work?
GENTLEMEN:

How does VIAGRA work?

VIAGRA works for men with erectile dysfunction (ED) by increasing blood flow to the penis so you can get and keep an erection hard enough for sex. Individual results may vary. It’s been proven to help guys with all degrees of ED. VIAGRA usually starts to work within 30–60 minutes. And you only take it when you need it.

VIAGRA works only when you are sexually stimulated. You may take it up to 4 hours before sexual activity. So don’t worry. There's no need to rush.

After sex? Your erection should go away. In the rare event of an erection lasting more than 4 hours, seek immediate medical help to avoid long-term injury.

APPROXIMATELY

Seventy-two percent, 80%, and 85% of the patients on 25 mg, 50 mg, and 100 mg of VIAGRA, respectively, achieved erections hard enough for sex, compared to 50% on placebo. Also, men taking VIAGRA showed an improvement in their ability to get and keep an erection versus those who took placebo.

NEXT:
Is VIAGRA right for me?
 Want to know if it’s right for you?
GENTLEMEN:

Want to know if it's right for you?

MORE THAN
23

million men

have been prescribed VIAGRA.

More than 23 million men have been prescribed VIAGRA.
More than 23 million men have been prescribed VIAGRA.

Who should not take VIAGRA?

Do not take VIAGRA if you:

  • Take medicines called “nitrates” (such as nitroglycerin)
  • Use street drugs called “poppers” such as amyl nitrate or amyl nitrite, and butyl nitrate
  • Take medicines called guanylate cyclase stimulators such as Adempas (riociguat)
  • Are allergic to sildenafil, as contained in VIAGRA and REVATIO, or any of the ingredients in VIAGRA. See the Patient Information for a complete list of ingredients in VIAGRA

VIAGRA and drug interactions.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

VIAGRA may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect the way VIAGRA works, causing side effects. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take any of the following:

  • medicines called nitrates
  • medicines called guanylate cyclase stimulators such as Adempas (riociguat)
  • medicines called alpha-blockers such as Hytrin (terazosin HCl), Flomax (tamsulosin HCl), Cardura (doxazosin mesylate), Minipress (prazosin HCl), Uroxatral (alfuzosin HCl), Jalyn (dutasteride and tamsulosin HCl), or Rapaflo (silodosin). Alpha-blockers are sometimes prescribed for prostate problems or high blood pressure. In some patients, the use of VIAGRA with alpha-blockers can lead to a drop in blood pressure or to fainting
  • medicines called HIV protease inhibitors, such as ritonavir (Norvir), indinavir sulfate (Crixivan), saquinavir (Fortovase or Invirase), or atazanavir sulfate (Reyataz)
  • some types of oral antifungal medicines, such as ketoconazole (Nizoral) and itraconazole (Sporanox)
  • some types of antibiotics, such as clarithromycin (Biaxin), telithromycin (Ketek), or erythromycin
  • other medicines that treat high blood pressure
  • other medicines or treatments for ED
  • VIAGRA contains sildenafil, which is the same medicine found in another drug called REVATIO. REVATIO is used to treat a rare disease called pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). VIAGRA should not be used with REVATIO or with other PAH treatments containing sildenafil or any other PDE5 inhibitors (such as Adcirca [tadalafil])

Click here to learn more about the potential side effects of VIAGRA.
 

  • Patients should always ask their doctors for medical advice about adverse events.
  • You may report an adverse event related to Pfizer products by calling 1-800-438-1985 (U.S. only). If you prefer, you may contact the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) directly. The FDA has established a reporting service known as MedWatch where healthcare professionals and consumers can report serious problems they suspect may be associated with the drugs and medical devices they prescribe, dispense, or use. Visit MedWatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

When it comes to hardness, VIAGRA can help.

Try using The Erection Hardness Score, a self-assessment tool used in VIAGRA clinical studies, to rate your own erection. If you’re concerned about your hardness score, ask your doctor if VIAGRA can help.

 

GRADE

NEXT:
Possible side effects of VIAGRA.
Wondering about possible side effects?

Wondering about possible side effects?

Safety is important. And it helps to know about possible side effects. 

VIAGRA can cause serious side effects. Rarely reported side effects include: 

  • an erection that will not go away (priapism). If you have an erection that lasts more than 4 hours, get medical help right away. If it is not treated right away, priapism can permanently damage your penis. 
  • sudden vision loss in one or both eyes. Sudden vision loss in one or both eyes can be a sign of a serious eye problem called non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). Stop taking VIAGRA and call your healthcare provider right away if you have sudden vision loss in one or both eyes. 
  • sudden hearing decrease or hearing loss. Some people may also have ringing in their ears (tinnitus) or dizziness. If you have these symptoms, stop taking VIAGRA and contact a doctor right away.

Other important information:

VIAGRA can help a man get and keep an erection when he becomes sexually stimulated. It’s not right for everyone. Here are some other things you should know:

Do not take VIAGRA if you:

  • take any medicines called nitrates, often prescribed for chest pain, or guanylate cyclase stimulators like Adempas (riociguat) for pulmonary hypertension. Your blood pressure could drop to an unsafe level.
  • are allergic to sildenafil, as contained in VIAGRA and REVATIO, or any of the ingredients in VIAGRA. 

Discuss your health with your doctor to ensure that you are healthy enough for sex. If you experience chest pain, dizziness, or nausea during sex, seek immediate medical help.

The most common side effects of VIAGRA are:

  • headache
  • flushing
  • upset stomach
  • abnormal vision, such as changes in color vision (such as having a blue color tinge) and blurred vision
  • stuffy or runny nose
  • back pain
  • muscle pain
  • nausea
  • dizziness
  • rash

In addition, heart attack, stroke, irregular heartbeat and death have happened rarely in men taking VIAGRA. Most, but not all, of these men had heart problems before taking VIAGRA. It is not known if VIAGRA caused these problems.

Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or does not go away.

These are not all the possible side effects of VIAGRA. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist.

Talk to your doctor.

Discuss your general health and ED symptoms with your doctor to see if VIAGRA is right for you.

  • Patients should always ask their doctors for medical advice about adverse events.
  • You may report an adverse event related to Pfizer products by calling 1-800-438-1985 (U.S. only). If you prefer, you may contact the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) directly. The FDA has established a reporting service known as MedWatch where healthcare professionals and consumers can report serious problems they suspect may be associated with the drugs and medical devices they prescribe, dispense, or use. Visit MedWatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Scroll or Click for Important Safety Information and Indication

Important Safety Information and Indication

Click to Expand

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Do not take VIAGRA (sildenafil citrate) if you:

  • take any medicines called nitrates, often prescribed for chest pain, or guanylate cyclase stimulators like Adempas (riociguat) for pulmonary hypertension. Your blood pressure could drop to an unsafe level
  • are allergic to sildenafil, as contained in VIAGRA and REVATIO, or any of the ingredients in VIAGRA

Discuss your health with your doctor to ensure that you are healthy enough for sex. If you experience chest pain, dizziness, or
nausea during sex, seek immediate medical help

VIAGRA can cause serious side effects. Rarely reported side effects include:

  • an erection that will not go away (priapism). If you have an erection that lasts more than 4 hours, get medical help right away.
    If it is not treated right away, priapism can permanently damage your penis
  • sudden vision loss in one or both eyes. Sudden vision loss in one or both eyes can be a sign of a serious eye problem called
    non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). Stop taking VIAGRA and call your healthcare provider right away if you
    have any sudden vision loss
  • sudden hearing decrease or hearing loss. Some people may also have ringing in their ears (tinnitus) or dizziness. If you have
    these symptoms, stop taking VIAGRA and contact a doctor right away

Before you take VIAGRA, tell your healthcare provider if you:

  • have or have had heart problems such as a heart attack,
    irregular heartbeat, angina, chest pain, narrowing of the aortic valve, or heart failure
  • have had heart surgery within the last 6 months
  • have pulmonary hypertension
  • have had a stroke
  • have low blood pressure, or high blood pressure that
    is not controlled
  • have a deformed penis shape
  • have had an erection that lasted for more than 4 hours
  • have problems with your blood cells such as sickle cell
    anemia, multiple myeloma, or leukemia
  • have retinitis pigmentosa, a rare genetic (runs in families)
    eye disease
  • have ever had severe vision loss, including an eye problem
    called NAION
  • have bleeding problems
  • have or have had stomach ulcers
  • have liver problems
  • have kidney problems or are having kidney dialysis
  • have any other medical conditions

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins,
and herbal supplements.

VIAGRA may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect the way VIAGRA works, causing side effects.
Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take any of the following:

  • medicines called nitrates
  • medicines called guanylate cyclase stimulators such as Adempas (riociguat)
  • medicines called alpha-blockers such as Hytrin (terazosin
    HCl), Flomax (tamsulosin HCl), Cardura (doxazosin
    mesylate), Minipress (prazosin HCl), Uroxatral (alfuzosin HCl),
    Jalyn (dutasteride and tamsulosin HCl), or Rapaflo (silodosin).
    Alpha-blockers are sometimes prescribed for prostate
    problems or high blood pressure. In some patients, the use
    of VIAGRA with alpha-blockers can lead to a drop in blood pressure or to fainting
  • medicines called HIV protease inhibitors, such as ritonavir (Norvir), indinavir sulfate (Crixivan), saquinavir (Fortovase or Invirase), or atazanavir sulfate (Reyataz)
  • some types of oral antifungal medicines, such as
    ketoconazole (Nizoral) and itraconazole (Sporanox)
  • some types of antibiotics, such as clarithromycin (Biaxin),
    telithromycin (Ketek), or erythromycin
  • other medicines that treat high blood pressure
  • other medicines or treatments for ED
  • VIAGRA contains sildenafil, which is the same medicine found
    in another drug called REVATIO. REVATIO is used to treat a
    rare disease called pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH).
    VIAGRA should not be used with REVATIO or with other PAH
    treatments containing sildenafil or any other PDE5 inhibitors
    (such as Adcirca [tadalafil])

VIAGRA does not protect against sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV.

The most common side effects of VIAGRA: headache; flushing; upset stomach; abnormal vision, such as changes in color vision
(such as having a blue color tinge) and blurred vision; stuffy or runny nose; back pain; muscle pain; nausea; dizziness; rash.

INDICATION

VIAGRA (sildenafil citrate) is prescription medicine used to treat erectile dysfunction (ED).

VIAGRA is not for women or children.

Please see full prescribing information for VIAGRA (25 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg) tablets.

Patients should always ask their doctors for medical advice about adverse events.

You may report an adverse event related to Pfizer products by calling 1-800-438-1985 (U.S. only). If you prefer, you may contact the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) directly. The FDA has established a reporting service known as MedWatch where healthcare professionals and consumers can report serious problems they suspect may be associated with the drugs and medical devices they prescribe, dispense, or use. Visit MedWatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Call 1-888-4-VIAGRA (1-888-484-2472), 9 AM to 7 PM Eastern Time, Monday through Friday for more information.

**Savings of up to $200 per prescription.
Limit 12 prescriptions per year with a minimum of 6 pills per prescription is required.
Total maximum savings for this offer are $2,400 per year.
This is not health insurance.
This offer is available only at participating pharmacies.
No membership fees.

 

Pfizer Inc

PO Box 29387

Mission, KS 66201-9618

1-855-284-2472